NEW SAFETY RULE FOR LITHIUM BATTERIES ON US FLIGHTS

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NEW SAFETY RULE FOR LITHIUM BATTERIES ON US FLIGHTS

Postby PaulTeolis » Wed Jan 09, 2008 5:50 pm

worth noting for those of you like myself who might travel with 6-8 lithium batteries when they travel

http://safetravel.dot.gov/

New US DOT Hazmat Safety Rule to Place Lithium Battery Limits in Carry-on Baggage on Passenger Aircraft Effective January 1, 2008

Passengers will no longer be able to pack loose lithium batteries in checked luggage beginning January 1, 2008 once new federal safety rules take effect. The new regulation, designed to reduce the risk of lithium battery fires, will continue to allow lithium batteries in checked baggage if they are installed in electronic devices, or in carry-on baggage if stored in plastic bags.

Common consumer electronics such as travel cameras, cell phones, and most laptop computers are still allowed in carry-on and checked luggage. However, the rule limits individuals to bringing only two extended-life spare rechargeable lithium batteries*, such as laptop and professional audio/video/camera equipment lithium batteries in carry-on baggage.

"Doing something as simple as keeping a spare battery in its original retail packaging or a plastic zip-lock bag will prevent unintentional short-circuiting and fires," said Krista Edwards, Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

Lithium batteries are considered hazardous materials because they can overheat and ignite in certain conditions. Safety testing conducted by the FAA found that current aircraft cargo fire suppression system would not be capable of suppressing a fire if a shipment of non-rechargeable lithium batteries were ignited in flight.

"This rule protects the passenger," said Lynne Osmus, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) assistant administrator for security and hazardous materials. "It's one more step for safety. It's the right thing to do and the right time to do it."

In addition to the new rule, PHMSA is working with the FAA, the National Transportation Safety Board, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the battery and airline industries, airline employee organizations, testing laboratories, and the emergency response communities to increase public awareness about battery-related risks and developments.
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Postby Reditor » Fri Jan 11, 2008 5:24 pm

Thanks for the tip Paul.
I tend to bring all my batteries and camera equipment in carry-on. Seems like a bit of an odd rule to me....but I wouldn't want to cause an unintentional fire when they're searching through my checked bag.
:D
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Postby thetravelingbee » Fri Jan 11, 2008 6:39 pm

So I have 3 rechargable batteries for my Canon camera - does this mean I can only bring 2 with me even as carry-ons from now on? Am I reading that right?
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Postby sinecure » Fri Jan 11, 2008 7:16 pm

In carry-on baggage, you may still carry any number of some types of lithium batteries, such as the ones used in cell phones and most laptop computers, provided you take measures to protect terminals. You may also carry up to two more powerful batteries, within the limits described here.


http://safetravel.dot.gov/whats_new_batteries.html


The following quantity limits apply to both your spare and installed batteries. The limits are expressed in grams of “equivalent lithium content.” 8 grams of equivalent lithium content is approximately 100 watt-hours. 25 grams is approximately 300 watt-hours:

* Under the new rules, you can bring batteries with up to 8-gram equivalent lithium content. All lithium ion batteries in cell phones are below 8 gram equivalent lithium content. Nearly all laptop computers also are below this quantity threshold.
* You can also bring up to two spare batteries with an aggregate equivalent lithium content of up to 25 grams, in addition to any batteries that fall below the 8-gram threshold. Examples of two types of lithium ion batteries with equivalent lithium content over 8 grams but below 25 are shown below.
* For a lithium metal battery, whether installed in a device or carried as a spare, the limit on lithium content is 2 grams of lithium metal per battery.
* Almost all consumer-type lithium metal batteries are below 2 grams of lithium metal. But if you are unsure, contact the manufacturer!



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Postby thetravelingbee » Sat Jan 12, 2008 1:27 pm

Awesome. Thanks for the clarification Sinecure!
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